Saturday, 9 November 2013

What got Frank all hot under the collar?

The Safari took Frank out an hour before first light as he was restless overnight and instead of turning to the main road he immediately headed the 'wrong way' nose in the air and nostrils quivering vigorously deffo something out there interesting him
After brekkie we had a look at what Steath-cam had picked up overnight. Lots of Wood Mouse action...wonder if they were using TP's 'Mouse-book' dissertation to communicate with their 'friends' at the other end of the garden and there might be some in the garage too which are eating the patio furniture!!! The neighbours cat also put in a brief appearance but the last file on the card was this one recorded after we'd been out and come back!

So good to see the Fox back...feeding time begins now. Might have to put food on a table to try to keep the mice off it...they're a nightmare but you can't deny they're cute.
There was a serious rattling on the window panes and when we looked out of the window 10 minutes later ther world was just re-emerging from what looked to have been a white-out.
Not much else happening at Base Camp, we topped the feeders up only to notice the Niger seed has been totally ignored - any tips on how to get the birdies interested in it.
Our Extreme Photographer came round with tales of wow about not having enough time to get the camera out. While he was having a  smoko in the back yard a Wasp flew past us, a medium sized hoverfly sp was also flying around. He did mention he'd not had any Blue Tits in his garden for ages and was wondering if this was the same here. We do get odd ones at Base Camp and later this arvo on the way back from a deathly quiet and quite chilly Patch 1 we saw two Blue Tits with a flock of about a dozen Long Tailed Tits in the garden hedge across the road from Base Camp...so there are some still about. Has there been a bit of a population decline this year? The most recent stats show their population to be higher than it's ever been during our birding 'career'. Similar chart for Great Tits too despite the  incessant ravages of Sparrowhawks those non-scientific numpties at Song Bird Survival would have you believe!
Where to next? Winter thrushes survey in the morning, then we hope to have a womble round the nature reserve not been for ages but we could be tempted to join SMcC tomorrow for a & watch at Norbreck Castle 1-2pm.
In the meantime let us know who's creeping round your outback just as the day is breaking.

4 comments:

Mark Owen said...

Niger seed... we took to this last year. Previously we used the wild bird mix but the little spp took the small seeds and left the grain and maize which just fed pheasants and pigeons. I tried niger because I wanted to feed the tree sparrows and thought it would suit but they seem to prefer peanuts.

When we first put out the niger it seemed to be ignored but later in the winter it attracted goldfinch in good numbers and we got an occasional redpoll and greenfinch too. In the hardest weather I spread some loose on the ground and that worked for chaffinch and tree sparrow as well. It makes me wonder if it not the feed but the feeder - we have one of those perspex tubes with two feeding holes and a tray to catch the bits that fall out. Maybe that doesn't do the trick.

Warren Baker said...

Good numbers of Blue and Great Tits here Davyman, not many Blackbirds though I'm finding!

Lancashire and Lakeland Outback Adventure Wildlife Safaris said...

Thanks Mark - our feeder is the same as yours. Even when seed is placed in tray the Beggars don't eat it but eat round it to get the sunflower hearts.
Will persevere with it!

Cheers

D

Aussie Glen said...

where's the shotgun for them ferals you got there....