Thursday, 1 September 2011

Quite a quiet day

The Safari didn’t see the Peregrines again this morning, nor much else although the twitterings of several Robins was much in evidence.
Our early morning visit to patch 2 gave us thousands of gulls on the huge expanse of beach, it being a very low tide. We didn’t have anywhere near the amount of time it would have taken to work through them all! Out at sea in the perfect viewing conditions we could only muster 38 Common Scoters, a single Sandwich Tern and, for something a little different, a Great Crested Grebe flying north.
At lunchtime things were no better. The sea had reached the wall so the gulls had disappeared, a few more flocks of Common Scoters were kicking about, mostly distant, numbering somewhere between 2-300 altogether. A Sandwich Tern flew in from well out to sea earnestly carrying a fish to present to someone, either that or it was stuck on its beak as they usually swallow them straight away.
With nothing else of note it’s a good job there are some pics from the last few days for you to enjoy; or should that be endure.
Where to next? Mothing on the dunes...but what are we after and will we be successful?
In the meantime let us know what’s not happening in your outback.

Here we go..

The start (well almost) of the 'road' that leads to Dean's...if you head the other way to the arrow that is


The Moss, think Lincolnshire/Norfolk border on a smaller scale, that's Aughton church on the hill in the distance



Hoof Fungus (?, we're flummoxed by fungi)



Any ideas anyone, quite orangey with almost white gills and a finley pock-marked upper surface



Southern Hawker


NOT silage bags in the corner of the field...



Patch 1 mystery fungus - pores rather than gills suggests a Boletus sp



A Lacewing, Wesmaelius sp - first record for the Fylde from Base Camp's kitchen window!



Peregrine on the tower but where do they disappear too?



Flooded road at Skippool - not a lot of leeway for climate change induced sea-level rise - or any other cause or course.



Best bird in the book - Mediterranean Gull



Lookin fine and dandy



Oh there's two...sorted!!!



Emptying the mothy gave us...


Setaceous Hebrew Character



(Not Svensonn's) Copper Underwing. doing that vibrating 'I need to warm up fast to escape the idiot with the camera' thing.



Lesser Yellow Underwing



A fairly pale and somewhat tatty Dun-bar



We've listed this as Agriphila straminella but someone will no doubt tell us it's actually A. tristella



and a dead thing to get your teeth into...no not literally...looks very like Brown House Moth but was only about 3-4mm long...any ideas or is it just a runty BHM?



That's all folks - normal picture service should be resumed for the next post.

2 comments:

Dean said...

Bet it`d take a few hours (or should that be days), Dave.

Sorry, can`t help with the fungi. Not one of my strongest points.

Warren Baker said...

blimey, you did well with the photo's Dave! Like the Peregrine:-)